After the Fighting, A Plague of Empty Classrooms

For The Faster Times:

Marjeh, Afghanistan—at the edge of the narrow dirt road dividing the farming regions of Karez-e-Saydi from Badula Gulp, a blue schoolhouse sits empty. Inside are six classrooms, with a weed-choked garden out back used to grow vegetables and sunflowers. The classrooms are fully stocked with lecture chairs and blackboards, and a storage room on the hall is piled with exercise books. When school is in session, two hundred boys and fifty girls from the surrounding area crowd into the hallways just after dawn, and study until late in the day.

The students haven’t been there in some time. The last teacher to come here left weeks ago, after trying and failing to teach all two hundred and fifty students, alone, for a month and a half. The district government was supposed to send four of them. He simply couldn’t do it, he said. He couldn’t meet their educational needs and was going mad trying to do so. So the classrooms are drifting with dust and the lessons on the chalkboards sit there, unfinished, waiting to be erased and started again.

Full article can be found here. (link fixed!)

4 comments
  1. Gwyneth Kucinski says: January 13, 20123:44 am

    Hello there, I enjoy your weblog. Is there some thing I can do to receive updates like a subscription or something? I am sorry I am not familiar with RSS? http://www.ctctradeshows.com

  2. Nancy says: November 18, 201111:29 pm

    This is a real problem with long term consequences. You make clear a serious need for teachers a local priority. What will happen?

  3. Sarah says: November 17, 20116:37 am

    Hey Lars, the link isn’t working for me :(

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